Monday, June 26, 2017

Exhibition: From Beneath the Surface

Maria Ahsing
Ka Wahine 'o Kaiona
woodcut print
The Hawaiian and Pacific Collections are currently hosting "From Beneath the Surface: Recent Prints Concerning Hawai'i." The seventeen prints in this exhibition were created during the 2016-2017 academic year by students working in the printmaking studio in the Department of Art and Art History at UH-Manoa. The artwork is the result of students' participation in projects that addressed a collective concern for current issues surrounding cultural, political and environmental conditions in Hawai'i. 
"From Beneath the Surface" will be on exhibit in the Hawaiian and Pacific Collections reading room throughout the summer, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Special thanks to Professor Charles Cohan for coordinating the production and installation of this exhibit.

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Honolulu Weekly online



The Hawaiian Collection is pleased to announce that the full run of the Honolulu Weekly is now available online at: https://evols.library.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10524/55438

The Honolulu Weekly was published between 1991-2013. For many in Honolulu during these years, especially prior to the advent of the Internet, the Weekly was a welcome alternative to the Honolulu dailies, offering a fresh take on Honolulu's music and culture scene, and focusing on astutely selected issues of the day. The paper’s weekly publication cycle and long-format cover stories often allowed writers to explore topics at a depth the daily newspapers were unable to, while also encouraging writers to go beyond simple reporting and into a more nuanced analysis. While the paper’s embrace of “advocacy journalism” often lead to accusations of bias, it’s editorial staff made no pretense at hiding that bias, and also made a point of publishing work that at times ran counter to its own ethos. In later years, the paper’s editorial staff also made a point each week to publish a majority of letters critical to the paper’s own content, making the Letters page an entertaining and informative forum of its own.

This digitization project has been a long time in the making, almost 4 years exactly. We thank the following people for their help and persistence:

Laurie Carlson, Publisher, Honolulu Weekly, for permission to digitize and post online, and for bringing the Honolulu Weekly into being. Martha Chantiny, retired Department Head, Desktop Network Services (DNS), and DNS staff Kathleen Luschek and Daniel Ishimitsu, for doing the heavy lifting of getting this QC-ed, OCR-ed, and uploaded to eVols, the Library’s digital repository. Amy Carlson, Collection Services Division Head, Hamilton Library; and Lyn Nagoshi, Nora Goya and Wendy Wong in Hamilton Library’s Fiscal Office.









Thursday, February 9, 2017

Cultural Diplomacy in the Marshall Islands


In late January 2017 digital and print copies of several genealogies from the Jack Tobin Papers were given to the Council of Iroij (Council of High Chiefs) of the Marshall Islands. The previously-made agreement relating to access was reconfirmed, this time by the entire Council. As part of the agreement the Pacific Collection created print copies for the Library at the College of the Marshall Islands, for the Historic Preservation Office, for the Alele (National Library, Archives and Museum), and for the Council. This is the conclusion of several years of work between the UHM Pacific Collection and Wilbert Alik, the head of the Department of Marshallese Studies at the College of the Marshall Islands.

The originals of these genealogies were donated to the University of Hawai'i-Manoa Library by Dr. Tobin in increments over several years, and will be permanently archived by the Pacific Collection. Dr. Tobin first went to the Marshall Islands in 1950 as a student of Dr. Len Mason, to work on the Pacific Science Board's Coral Atoll Project (CAP). Later in 1950, Tobin was hired as an anthropological field consultant by the Civil Administration Unit of Naval Operations. During the Trust Territory Administration era, he served as the sole district anthropologist for the Marshall Islands, a position he held through 1957. Between 1967 and 1975, he served as community development adviser to the Marshall Islands. (More on Dr. Tobin's life and work can be found here. To view an online collection of photographs from Dr. Tobin's time in the Marshalls, click here.)

Dr. Tobin worked on collecting and editing the genealogies throughout the decades he spent in the Marshall Islands, and remained closely connected to the islands even after he had retired and relocated to Honolulu. Many thanks to Seth Irwin, Ellie Seaton, Allyson Ota, and Kealiʻi MacKenzie who all worked at various times to ensure these sacred objects were preserved, digitized and copied. Thanks to Ruth Abbott and Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner for transporting the copies from Hawaiʻi to the Marshall Islands.

Thursday, March 24, 2016

Recent acquisitions: Twenty-four original photo cabinet card views of Tahiti


The Pacific Collection recently acquired a set of twenty-four cabinet card images of Tahiti, taken circa 1895 by an unidentified member of an American tourist group. The photographs include a range of subjects, some with captions, including landscapes, interiors and exteriors of buildings, and Tahitians. One image in particular stands out -- a man, woman and child in front of their home. On the back of the image is a hand-written caption: "Lawyer Goupil's residence, finest on the island." On the one hand, both the image and caption are somewhat unimpressive, but they hint at a more historic value: Auguste Goupil was a well-known lawyer in Tahiti. The image presumably shows Goupil, his wife and their daughter, Jeanne. Roughly a year after this photo was taken, Goupil hired Paul Gauguin to paint Jeanne, which resulted in one of Gauguin's more famous works, "Portrait of a Young Woman, Vaite (Jeanne) Goupil." A detail of the photograph and Gauguin's painting are pictured at right.
The Tahitian images are one of thirty-seven separate photo collections maintained by the Pacific Collection. To browse a list of these collections, visit the library's Voyager catalog, and in the basic search mode, select "Call number (DVD, CD, VHS, etc.)" from the list of search options, and then search for Photograph P. The Pacific Collection has also digitized roughly 16,000 images from it's physical holdings. All of these are available for viewing online via the UH-M Library's digital collections homepage.

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Jack Tobin Papers

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http://digicoll.manoa.hawaii.edu/tobin/index.php?s=
Pacific Collection librarian Eleanor Kleiber recently finished processing the Jack Tobin Papers, and they are now available for public use. Jack Adair Tobin, Ph.D. (June 15, 1920-June 18, 2010) was an anthropologist who worked in the Marshall Islands, beginning in 1950. This manuscript collection, which comprises roughly six linear feet of material and covers the bulk of Dr. Tobin's professional life, is extremely important in that it contains primary source documentation of numerous aspects of Marshallese life during a period of intense change.

In addition to the physical materials in the collection, nearly 2,000 photographs have also been digitized and are available online. A finding aid for the collection is also available online.

The Jack Tobin Collection is one of more than 60 Pacific manuscript collections -- because these collections are comprised primarily of unpublished material, they are an important tool when searching for primary source documentation. To view a browseable list of these collections, go to the library’s Voyager catalog, and in the basic search mode, select Call number (DVDs, CDs, VHS, etc.) from the list of “search by” options, and then search for MANUSCRIPT P. This search will bring up a list of all manuscripts held by the Pacific Collection. You can also search through our cataloged photograph collections by repeating the above steps using the search term PHOTOGRAPH P. (In both searches, do not include the period that follows the "P" in the above sentences.) Researchers interested in Hawai‘i can duplicate these searches using the terms MANUSCRIPT H and PHOTOGRAPH H to pull up Hawai‘i-specific manuscript and photograph collections.